United Parrot Breeders 

 

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UPB mission statement

We strive to provide you, the client, with the best quality hand-reared pet parrot available. We do this by providing the parent birds with the best environment possible to live in, the best fresh foods and pellets to eat and the most stress free life possible. All our baby birds are raised with their siblings, fully socialised with adults, children and animals. We stay in touch with clients for as long as they deem fit. We offer 24/7, lifetime support by email and telephone, as well as our exclusive web based forum. All our babies are bred by us, raised by us, and sold by us. We do not supply pet shops or other hand rearers

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Basics

There are only a few basic requirements for owning a parrot, but each one is essential to your new parrots health and welfare.

Quality time         -    Your new parrot will need lots and lots of time with you and out of his cage. Parrots are flock birds and very sociable creatures. They NEED time interacting with others, they NEED to feel part of a flock. They NEED you to be part of their flock.

Hygiene                -        A very important requirement. Parrot dropping contain many different enzymes and urates. All of these can "go off" and all can cause problems if not cleaned up properly. Fruit left in the cage soon decomposes at room temperature, the fungi and bacteria is invisible to the naked eye for a long time before any odour or visual signs of decomposition show. Discarded seed, pellet even water can contain harmful bacteria and disease. To avoid all these dangers, cages must be kept clean. The tray should be cleaned at least once a day, and the whole cage cleaned once a week and wiped down with a specific avian disinfectant. All food bowls should be cleaned and disinfected daily.

Quality time         -    Your new parrot will need lots and lots of time with you and out of his cage. Parrots are flock birds and very sociable creatures. They NEED time interacting with others, they NEED to feel part of a flock. They NEED you to be part of their flock.

Toys                    -        Toys are vital to keep your parrot mentally stimulated. Rope toys are good to chew and to shred. Wooden toys can be chewed and destroyed. Plastic toys can be great for hiding food morsels inside. A mix of all these types, as well as swings and ladders will keep your parrot amused when your not around. Change the toys position in the cage regularly, so the parrot doesn't get used to them in a set position. Introduce new toys while the parrot is out of the cage. Don't put a new toy in the cage while the parrot is in there, it could spook him and after all, you are invading his "space".

Quality time         -    Your new parrot will need lots and lots of time with you and out of his cage. Parrots are flock birds and very sociable creatures. They NEED time interacting with others, they NEED to feel part of a flock. They NEED you to be part of their flock.

Cage positioning    -    The main considerations are, keep cages out of all draughts (draughts kill parrots). Keep cages away from direct sunlight (dehydration is also a killer). Keep cages out of dark corners ( parrots need sunlight to help convert calcium for their bones). Cages should be positioned so the parrot can see what's going on ( even when he is in his cage, he has to feel part of the flock).

Quality time         -    Your new parrot will need lots and lots of time with you and out of his cage. Parrots are flock birds and very sociable creatures. They NEED time interacting with others, they NEED to feel part of a flock. They NEED you to be part of their flock.

Diet                     -    A balanced diet is essential to your parrots well-being. Whether you choose a seed based diet or a pellet based diet ( as we at UPB do), balance the diet with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables. If needed, add supplements, vitamins or minerals. If in doubt, get advice. Contact your breeder they will know what's best for your parrot. If you don't know who your breeder was, ask around anyone else who has a parrot, someone will be able to help you. If you still acnt find anyone to help, visit your local avian vet. Vets are there to give advice. They don't just treat sick animals. Every vet would rather dish out advice and prevent an illness, than treat an illness. Use them!

Quality time         -    Your new parrot will need lots and lots of time with you and out of his cage. Parrots are flock birds and very sociable creatures. They NEED time interacting with others, they NEED to feel part of a flock. They NEED you to be part of their flock.

Finally                -       Did we mention QUALITY TIME? The single most reason a parrot becomes a problem bird, is lack of true quality time. Admittedly, education of the new owner leads to all sorts of problems, but your here reading this so you are trying to learn about  parrots, so that's one less thing to worry about. You already know about diet being a potential hazard and you know you have the money to afford a parrot, what you need to do is figure out if you have the TIME to spend with a parrot! TIME every day. 365 days a year. Possibly for 20, 30, 40 years. Have you got that TIME to give? If you are not sure, I can tell you easily enough. YOU HAVE NOT. Don't buy a parrot. It will end up in a rescue, or worse be handed from pillar to post for years. The only people who should buy a parrot are those who are SURE they have the TIME to devote to a parrot, SURE they have the LOVE to give to a parrot, and SURE they can undertake the COMMITMENT a parrot demands. So, ask your self the questions, are you SURE you can give a parrot the home it deserves, the respect it deserves, the life it deserves? Because the one thing a parrot does not deserve, is someone who is not SURE.

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